Naas Hospital visitors warned to stay away as highly contagious vomiting infection found

Visiting restrictions remain in place today

Conor McHugh

Reporter:

Conor McHugh

Email:

conor@leinsterleader.ie

Naas Hospital visitors warned to stay away as highly contagious vomiting infection found

Strict visitor restrictions remain in place at Naas General Hospital

Strict visitor restrictions remain in place at Naas General Hospital today, Monday, December 31, as a result of the highly contagious Norovirus infection can cause the sudden onset of severe vomiting and diarrhoea.

A number of patients have been exhibiting Norovirus-ike symptoms. A statement from the hospital issued just moments ago said that the “primary concern is the safety and welfare of patients and the reduction in the spread of Norovirus within the hospital”. 

“Visiting restrictions remain in place for Curragh and Allen wards today. As this is an active situation, this may change. Patients should contact the hospital before visiting to get up to date information on the restrictions,” the statement read.

Alice Kinsella, the hospital’s General Manager noted that, “the hospital are acutely aware that a visiting ban can be difficult for our patients and their families, especially at this time of year.  It is something that we have to do to protect patients from the risk of acquiring Norovirus. 

“We are sorry if this causes any inconvenience to patients and relatives.  Proper hand washing is one of the most important ways to prevent spread of Norovirus.  Hand washing is especially important before eating, before preparing food and after using the toilet.”

All infection control measures are in place and every effort is being made to manage and contain the spread of the Norovirus.

Anyone with any queries about visiting times or visiting a particular ward should ring the hospital on 045 849500.

Read also: Plans lodged for extension to Kilcullen's Cross and Passion Secondary School

Norovirus infection can cause the sudden onset of severe vomiting and diarrhoea. The virus is highly contagious and commonly spread through food or water that is contaminated during preparation or contaminated surfaces. You can also be infected through close contact with an infected person. Diarrhoea, abdominal pain and vomiting typically begin 12 to 48 hours after exposure.

Norovirus symptoms last one to three days, and most people recover completely without treatment. However, for some people — especially infants, older adults and people with underlying disease — vomiting and diarrhoea can be severely dehydrating and require medical attention.

Norovirus infection occurs most frequently in closed and crowded environments such as hospitals, nursing homes, child care centres and schools. If you have recently had vomiting / diarrhoea, do not visit a hospital or nursing home until you have been well for 48 hours.  If your child has had vomiting / diarrhoea, they should not go to school / crèche until they have been well for 48 hours.

Most people with norovirus recover at home, with rest, fluids and over the counter medication. The HSE provides useful advice from GPs and pharmacists on how to recognise the Norovirus infection, and care for yourself or someone else www.undertheweather.ie