Late Late Show's Ryan Tubridy visits Tiglin rehabilitation centre run by two Kildare men

First started as a small project in Shechem House in Newbridge

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Late Late Show's Ryan Tubridy visits Tiglin rehabilitation centre run by two Kildare men

Deky Byrne, Ger Hanley, Aubrey McCarty, Ryan Tubridy, Gillian Hussey, Phil Thompson, Rosaleen Conroy and Barbara Reid

Chairman of Tiglin and Kildare Businessman, Aubrey McCarthy and CEO of Tiglin, Philip Thompson from Newbridge welcomed Ryan Tubridy to Tiglin, the Drug Rehabilitation Centre in Wicklow recently.

Following an interview on the Late Late Show on Friday April 13, with graduate of the programme, Paul Mahon and retired judge and patron of Tiglin, Gillian Hussey, Ryan was keen to visit the centre to learn more about the charity.

"Today I have met some extraordinary people who have lived through extra ordinary circumstances and have come out the other side for all the right reasons. I have learned today that as the sign says, there is life beyond addiction,” Tubridy said while on his visit.

SEE ALSO: Investigations continuing into €9,000 cocaine haul found in discarded backpack in Kildare town

Retired judge Hussey entertained Ryan with former students who have gone on to accomplish success in business and education.

She explained to Ryan that Tiglin started as a small project in Shechem House in Newbridge and has now grown to one of the most successful rehabilitation centres in Europe under the leadership of Newbridge man, Philip Thompson and Naas man, Aubrey McCarthy.

They all spent the afternoon in Tiglin, celebrating life beyond addiction with the students who catered for him by putting on a BBQ. 

Tubridy was very impressed with the level of support Tiglin receives from the pubic, particularly those from Kildare who go above and beyond for the charity.  

Tiglin’s Bereavement Counsellor, Rosaleen Conroy explained about the importance of bereavement counselling in addiction services. “Loss is more than death, it's the loss of opportunity,” she said.

Mr McCarthy said: “It was a massive opportunity to have former student, Paul Mahon and Patron of Tiglin and former Judge Gillian Hussey on the Late Late show a couple of months ago. So, we were  so pleased to welcome Ryan here as a follow-up to his interview. I think we have a friend in Ryan and it was a pleasure to introduce him to other students, graduates and the staff at Tiglin. We had a lovely afternoon and we look forward to seeing him again.”

Tiglin is a rehabilitation centre based in the Wicklow Mountains, Ashford. They tackle one of the biggest social problems facing Ireland today by offering a life-skills program for both men and women. It is a holistic program that offers life beyond addiction.

Tiglin also offers a Homeless Outreach programme through their No Bucks Café. The mobile café hits the streets five days a week, providing food, clothing, and blankets for the homeless and it helps them to slowly build relationships and friendships with people on the streets by providing a safe and welcoming environment for people to share their life stories.

The bus is manned by the very people who have completed the addiction programme and have come out the other side of a very difficult journey.

Tiglin is home to just over 40 full time residents. Catering for both men and women, the programme consists of 10-12 months residential rehabilitation, 4-6 months residential aftercare and follow on transitional housing which provides structured support while promoting independent living when the programme is complete.

The facility includes a fully functioning professional kitchen, laundry, gym, prayer and meditation room, sitting room, games area, class room, a dental surgery, IT suite, counselling rooms, poly-tunnel, wood working work shop and all this in the middle of 3000 acres of idyllic forestrt.

Their woman’s facility, near Brittas Bay, caters for 12 people and they are currently working on expanding this facility to cater for the needs of women who have children.