Kildare North TD Catherine Murphy calls for rent law change

Rent pressure zones have failed said Leixlip deputy

Henry Bauress

Reporter:

Henry Bauress

Email:

henry.bauress@leinsterleader.ie

Kildare North TD Catherine Murphy calls for rent law change

Catherine Murphy TD

Housing rent caps should be introduced nationwide, the Social Democrats co-leader amd Kildare North TD, Catherine Murphy, has said following the latest Daft.ie report.

The Daft.ie report states that in Kildare, the average rent for a 3 bed house rose 10.5% to €1,210. The average rent for a one bed apartment rose 12.5% to €886 and for a two bedroom apartment by 11.2% to €1,015.

Nationwide the average rent for properties advertised on its website for the last quarter of 2017 was €1,227 per month, with Dublin rents at €1,822, up 10.9 per cent, compare to Q4 2016.

According to Daft economist, Ronan  Lyons, while rent controls were introduced in 2016 which limit rent increases to 4 per cent, they’re not working due to the strength of the imbalance in supply and demand.

Deputy Murphy said rents are continuing to rise to totally unsustainable levels across the country. She also said that rent pressure zones, which apply to Kildare, have failed.

“Rental costs have skyrocketed beyond levels not seen since the Celtic Tiger and are now 26 per cent, or almost €380 a month (€4,500 a year) higher than their previous peak in 2008.

The Kildare North TD said: “It is now beyond time for the government to face facts – rent pressure zones have failed and the only way to make rents affordable is to apply proper rent certainty measures.”

She called for an immediate linking of rents to the Consumer Price Index until there is sufficient housing to drive down rents.

Housing charity, Threshold, has said that stronger policing

and extension of Rent Pressure Zone (RPZ) legislation is essential in

promoting compliance among landlords, and lower rent inflation.

Its chief executive, John-Mark McCafferty, the pace and extent of rent increases is unsustainable for people living in the sector, and measures to deliver sustainability needs to be a critical focus. “Continued

policing of this (RPZ) legislation, coupled with nationwide roll out of RPZ

controls, would be an effective step in bringing price stability into

the rental market.

He said Threshold is worried that this is the beginning

of a trend, like that of London, where only the most

well off can afford to live in Dublin. “Large parts of the capital have

historically always been places where people both lived and worked.

This is no longer a viable option for low income households in

particular those in receipt of housing supports such as HAP and Rent

Supplement.”