THROWBACK THURSDAY: Black Masses and bad influences in Naas

Theresa Murray takes a look at times gone by

Theresa Murray

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Theresa Murray

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THROWBACK THURSDAY: Black Masses and bad influences in Naas

It was said there were 'Black Masses' in Naas 50 years ago

Theresa Murray takes a look back at times gone by
The father of a girl who appeared at the local court told the judge that there were Black Masses taking place in Naas and a very bad influence in the town.

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The Leinster Leader on February 15, 1964, was reporting on the case of two teenage girls who appeared before Justice Keane at Naas, charged with larcenies in the town the previous October.
The offences were committed, it was stated, while the girls were footloose and living rough in the area for almost a week.
One of the girls, for whom Mr J. Brady BL appeared, was charged with stealing six bottles of milk value 4s; two pairs of shoes value £3-10s; fruit cakes value 9s-9d; and sums of 7s, £1-4-6 and £1-7-6. The second girl, who was not professionally represented, was charged with stealing the milk, shoes and fruit cakes.
Detective Garda T. Connolly told the Justice that the two girls had come to a dance in Naas. They did not return home after it but stayed in the area, sleeping rough in hay barns etc for about six days. Mr Brady’s client had stolen the money while at dances in the military barracks.
Mr Brady said his client’s father had to a certain extent lost control of her. She had a charge of arson in Celbridge against her; this charge had been adjourned until June to see how she would behave. The incidents with which she was now charged had occurred around the same time as the arson offence.
In reply to the Justice, Mr Brady said that damage to the premises of Donaldson’s, the law printers, had been in the region of £10,000 to £12,000.
After these incidents, said Mr Brady, the girl had run away from home but she had learned the error of her ways and had now got a job which unfortunately, was affected by a strike. He asked the justice for lenience, saying that his client had got over that period of her life.
The second girl’s father said his daughter was at an age when it was almost impossible to control her. She was in court over one escapade which might never occur again.
He then went on to suggest that a lot of inquiries could be made in the town of Naas about Black Masses etc. There was a very bad influence in the town, he declared. Naturally all these things went on behind closed doors. Basically his daughter was not a bad girl, he added.
Supt Corbett said these girls with another, more senior, had been footloose around Naas for a week before the gardai found out that they were absent from home.
“They have been meeting with people here in Naas that they would be better off if they had never seen. I think some of these people are present in court now,” added Supt Corbett.
The Probation Act was applied in the case of Mr Brady’s client; the charges against the second girl were adjourned to June.