The Kildare teacher changing children's lives in Uganda

Katherine Hession from Naas is a volunteer

Sarah Peppard

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Sarah Peppard

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sarah.peppard@leinsterleader.ie

The Kildare teacher changing children's lives in Uganda

Kathy Hession (front in yellow dress) with the children she is teaching in Uganda

A Naas teacher volunteering in Uganda has gone viral online, in a video where she is singing Irish trad tune Rattlin’ Bog with local children.

SEE ALSO: WATCH: Kildare teacher sings Rattlin' Bog with children in Uganda school

Katherine Hession (27) is currently spending a month volunteering with Nurture Africa in Nansana Centre.

The video, shared on the Leader website and by Today FM, has been viewed thousands of times, and shows Kathy and the children in the centre giving it socks signing the Rula Bula classic.

“She loves and it and she said the children are just so beautiful, they literally have nothing but yet they’re so happy the whole time, and they never complain”, Kathy’s mam Mary said.

“She told them, ‘do you know now you’re famous back in Ireland?’, and they were all so excited, and delighted with themselves”, she added.

Kathy is a former pupil of the Convent Primary School in Naas and Newbridge College and is going into her third year of teaching at John Scottus School in Dublin.

She first got a love for volunteering while studying in UCD.

“She went to Haiti a few years ago when she was in UCD. She just loves helping people who are less fortunate than ourselves.

“Haiti was a fantastic experience for her, she was doing a bit of everything. And she always said when she started working she’d go back out again as a teacher.

“Her younger sister Laura was out there last year, she’s a mental health nurse, and she just found it so amazing”, Mary added.

Nurture Africa is an Irish founded organisation that helps people undertake short term overseas volunteer placements for second level or third level students. or professionals.

Kathy had to raise around €3,000 before going over.

“It’s very much a charity that everything goes back into the camp,” concluded Mary.