Kildare dad warns of iron overload dangers for National Haemochromatosis Awareness week

Brian Keegan will be manning the stand at Whitewater

Niamh O'Donoghue

Reporter:

Niamh O'Donoghue

Email:

niamh.odonoghue@leinsterleader.ie

Kildare dad warns of iron overload dangers for National Haemochromatosis Awareness week

Brian Keegan cartwheeling with Niall and Jack Mc Caffrey

The cartwheeling Newbridge dad is back again this year at Whitewater Shopping Centre to promote National Haemochromatosis Awareness week which runs from June 4 to 10.

Manning the stand this Thursday, Brian Keegan is keen to show that people can live a normal life after being diagnosed with Haemachromatosis.

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Diagnosed two years ago, Brian is in good health and is able to have a full and varied life.

Originally from Newbridge, he wants to raise awareness of the dangers of having too much iron in the blood.

“It’s a genetic disease which results in the body adsorbing and accumulating iron causing ‘iron overload’. If diagnosed it is an easy disease to treat and manage, but if left untreated it can cause organ or tissue damage and can be fatal.”

He said common symptoms include chronic fatigue, joint pain, diabetes and irregular heartbeat.

“If you feel you may be suffering from any of the above talk to your local GP or visit IHA’s website www.haemochromit
osis-ir.com.”

Alternatively you can visit the stand at the Whitewater in Newbridge next Thursday June 7, or email on info@haemochromotosis-ir.com.

Since last year’s awareness event, Brian said several people have come up to him to say they had been diagnosed with ‘iron overload’.

He said any GP can carry out a simple test to find out if a person has hemochromotosis.

“Haemochromatosis is under-diagnosed, partly because public awareness of the condition is low but also because its symptoms, including fatigue, depression and joint pain, are confused with a range of other illnesses,” said Margaret Mullett of the Irish Haemochromatosis Association.