DCSIMG

Pilot scheme to cut ground pollution risk

David Smyth Dr. Icarus, NUI Maynooth, Jenny Deakin, EPA, Laurence Gill and Donata Dubber, Trinity College, Margaret Keegan RPa, pictured at the launch of the Barrogstown and Kilmacredock Waste Water (BKWW) Scheme in Carton House, Maynooth, Monday evening, July 7. Photo Tony Keane.

David Smyth Dr. Icarus, NUI Maynooth, Jenny Deakin, EPA, Laurence Gill and Donata Dubber, Trinity College, Margaret Keegan RPa, pictured at the launch of the Barrogstown and Kilmacredock Waste Water (BKWW) Scheme in Carton House, Maynooth, Monday evening, July 7. Photo Tony Keane.

IRISH Water is keen to emphasize smaller schemes, Kildare County Council Director of Service, Joe Boland said when he spoke at the launch of an innovative group waste water scheme in north Kildare on Monday 7 July.

The Barrogstown and Kilmacreddock scheme will be the largest private group sewage scheme of its type in Ireland.

Mr. Boland said he was very impressed and congratulated local people for the scheme, launched by Environment Minister, Phil Hogan, at Carton House.

The scheme is of national importance because septic tanks are causing pollution problems around the country, including in this area. Ireland has been fined by the European Union for not implementing environmental regulations.

Laurence Gill of Trinity, which will monitor the project, said 40% of the country has a problem with septic tanks because of poor percolation of the soil leading to pollution of water, in particular.

With a scheme like this you could solve 30% of problem sites.

David Smyth, a NUI Maynooth scientist, pointing to huge problems in Galway in 2009, said climate change will mean a scheme like this will be more important.

Paddy Watters, a committee member, said this would not have happened without the drive of the community, which will contribute €5,000 each

Kildare North TD, Bernard Durkan, said that instead of worrying local people have done something.

Minister Hogan said the scheme will provide a roadmap for other communities in Ireland and will help to comply with both Irish and EU wastewater disposal regulation. It shows how communities can come together to protect and develop the area in which they reside, he said

 

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