DCSIMG

Demand for permanent Naas school building

4th and 5th Class pupils (front kneeling) Lucy Tuohy, Kimberley Morrisson, Milena Modestdo; (back) Grace Grimes, Wyona Russell, Sam Hillis, Rebecca Loughlin, Ellie Murray, and Teacher Caroline Colleran, from Pipers Hill Community National School, Naas. Photo Tony Keane.

4th and 5th Class pupils (front kneeling) Lucy Tuohy, Kimberley Morrisson, Milena Modestdo; (back) Grace Grimes, Wyona Russell, Sam Hillis, Rebecca Loughlin, Ellie Murray, and Teacher Caroline Colleran, from Pipers Hill Community National School, Naas. Photo Tony Keane.

Pressure is mounting for a new school building to be provided for the Naas Community National School at Piper’s Hill.

It comes despite an announcement that two additional classrooms are to be provided at the current site.

Cllr. James Lawless criticised a statement by Labour TD Emmet Stagg announcing that outgoing Minister for Education Ruairi Quinn has approved “permanent accommodation” for the school adding he (Quinn) “has sanctioned the building of two additional mainstream classrooms.”

The school opened in August 2010 and serves Naas, Sallins, Two Mile House, Caragh, Johnstown, Kill, Newbridge and Clane.

It was launched as part of a new model of education catering for children of all faiths and none, and is interdenominational. But Cllr James Lawless claims it’s in need of “urgent repair”. He says a door recently came off the hinges, there is evidence of dampness and electricity boards have short circuited due to water leaks.

“Despite all this and clearly being in dire need of a permanent home, the school cannot even start its wait on a building list as it is still awaiting Departmental recognition,” said Cllr. Lawless. He added the new classrooms referred to “are actually prefabs, a bare stop-gap measure and hardly permanent. The school and its families deserve better.”

Parent Nuala Holloway, secretary of the Parent Teacher Association, said the arrival of a recent portacabin as a principal’s office does not address all of the problems - not least because it’s sited outside the school building. “All schools have prefabs but these also have a permanent building, which we don’t have. The school is growing every year it doesn’t make sense not to have a permanent building,” she said.

 

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