Passing of Clane MS sufferer who appeared in RTE documentary

A brave Clane MS sufferer who spoke out against euthanasia in an RTE documentary due to be broadcast last night (October 15) sadly passed away before the programme aired.

A brave Clane MS sufferer who spoke out against euthanasia in an RTE documentary due to be broadcast last night (October 15) sadly passed away before the programme aired.

Former teacher, Margaret McEvoy (66) had been suffering from MS for 20 years but was strongly against assisted death.

At her funeral mass on Monday, Fr. Paul Boyle referred to her appearance on the documentary, ‘A Time to Die,” scheduled to be broadcast last night.

An RTE spokeswoman confirmed the programme had been “adjusted to acknowledge Margaret’s passing” and said her family was “very supportive of her contribution.”

The documentary followed the stories of a number of Irish people who wish to end their lives by assisted death or euthanasia.

Margaret (nee Balfe) passed away on 12 October.

Described as “a lovely woman,” she was married to former Cllr. Tony McEvoy and was mother to current Kildare County Councillor, Padraig, and Maria.

Margaret lived in Clane for forty years and while having to battle with illness, with what Fr. Boyle called “courage and strength,” she was heavily involved in the life of the community.

A teacher in Scoil Mhuire, she was also very involved in other schools an community organisations. There was a large turnout at her funeral.

Many groups such as the John O’Sullivan Centre and Le Cheile were “enriched by her presence,” said Fr. Boyle.

Her health challenges were many and her son, Padraig, on behalf of family, thanked the many individuals and bodies, the O’Sullivan Centre, the MS Care Centre in Bushy Park, CASA, the Access group, which campaigned on disabled parking, the great work of the HSE Community Care team, great neighbours, medical staff at Beaumont and Naas General Hospital.

Margaret is also survived by son in law, Lars, grandchildren, Ollie and Evelyn, brothers, sisters and others.

- Niamh O’Donoghue and Henry Bauress.