Whyte sent forward to Circuit Court trial

Mark Whyte, the man who is set to face charges of allegedly tying up another man, cutting off his ear and making him eat it over the course of February 13 and 14, 2011 will face trial in the Circuit Court.

Mark Whyte, the man who is set to face charges of allegedly tying up another man, cutting off his ear and making him eat it over the course of February 13 and 14, 2011 will face trial in the Circuit Court.

At Naas District Court last Thursday, August 23, Gardai presented his legal representative with a book of evidence on the matter.

Judge Patrick Clyne sent him forward for trial at Naas Circuit Court starting November 13.

Mr. Whyte, whose address is listed as 1613, Pairc Mhuire, Newbridge, has been in custody awaiting trial since he was refused bail in early May.

It has taken some time for Gardai and the DPP to come to the point where they were in a position to formally bring charges against him.

In the past few weeks the State has been put under some pressure to bring the matter to a head.

Earlier this month, conscious that Mr. Whyte had already spent three months in custody, Judge Patrick Clyne said he would adjourn for two weeks and mark it peremptory against the State.

That meant that the DPP would have to show significant progress in processing the case, or risk having the charges withdrawn.

And on Thursday, August 16, it was announced that that the DPP is preparing a charge against Mr. Whyte.

Mr. Whyte has applied for bail in the District and High Courts on a number of occasions and been refused each time. Gardai have always objected to it amidst concerns (among others) that when arrested, Mr. Whyte had warned: “This won’t get near a court, I’ll make sure of that”.

Mr. Whyte also has a history of not turning up in court. And it has been alleged in court that the alleged victim, has approached Gardai twice in the recent past saying he fears Mr. Whyte and that he had been contacted by associates of Mr. Whyte.

The case has been rather high profile given the nature of the alleged offence.