Newbridge clock, which survived Easter Rising, restored

DID you hear the one about the two faced clock designed especially for the CYMS in Newbridge in 1914, which got lost in transit at the GPO during the Easter Rising, only to turn up for a number of years, get lost and turn up again?

DID you hear the one about the two faced clock designed especially for the CYMS in Newbridge in 1914, which got lost in transit at the GPO during the Easter Rising, only to turn up for a number of years, get lost and turn up again?

Well it may be a tall tale, but it is all true according to the most recent finder of the clock.

Moorefield Drive man Ray Coffey luckily stumbled upon it at the back of his shed last year.

“The CYMS in Newbridge wanted to get a clock that has two faces to hang between two rooms,” explained Ray.

“The clock was ordered from Hopkins and Hopkins in Dublin back in 1913. There was no sign of it after a couple of years so somebody got on to Hopkins and Hopkins who confirmed that they posted it to the GPO.

The GPO was contacted and the CYMS was told, in essence: “sorry about that but we had the Easter Rising and everything was destroyed”.

So everyone forgot about the two-faced clock again until after another couple of years, when the GPO got in touch to say they had come across the timepiece and it was in perfect working order.”

The clock proudly hung in the CYMS premises in Eyre Street for years after that, until Ray’s late father Jim was given it to clean in 1971.

“He had left it in the garage to clean,” said Ray. “I’m a hoarder so when I came across a clock in a black bag in a skip and thinking it belonged to Coffey’s Bar [on Main Street, which Ray’s family used to own] I took it and left it down at the end of the shed and forgot about it.

“Then Leo Kennedy of the CYMS asked me one day if I had ever come across it as it had been given to my father to clean.

“I went into the shed and there in the corner was the two faced clock. I was delighted.”

The clock was brought back to full working order after a year as parts had to be sourced from all over the world to put it back together.

“It is hanging back up in the CYMS now,” added Ray. “I think it is even back in it’s original spot.”

Leo Kennedy of the CYMS said they are delighted to have the clock back after 42 years.

“Especially with the historical significance of it,” he said. “It was a club feature from 1918 to 1969 when it was taken down. We’ve had a lot of old members popping into see it, we are all delighted.”

- Paula Campbell