Information on turbines in Allenwood

Brendan Connolly of Bord na Mona speaking to locals Frank Cross, Jnr and Snr.
Bord na Mona held an all-day information meeting last Tuesday, November 19 at Allenwood GAA.

Bord na Mona held an all-day information meeting last Tuesday, November 19 at Allenwood GAA.

It was somewhat fitting that an information event on infrastructure that will dominate the landscape was held beside the site of the Allenwood Power station, whose chimney dominated the surrounding landscape for many years until it was knocked in 1994.

Large swathes of north and west Kildare are owned and managed by the semi-state company - and these areas, stretching from Allenwood to Edenderry and beyond, are where they’re considering buidling the turbines.

However, they have not, as yet, decided exactly where the turbines will be built, saying testing is ongoing to see where the best wind resources are, and that it is likely to be 2017 before construction begins.

When the Leinster Leader visited at about 4pm that day, there weren’t many people around, although we understand it was better attended after working hours.

Bord na Mona officials reported that they had not encountered any protestors.

“People generally just wanted more detail on where exactly these will be going, and if there will be pylons associated with them,” a representative said.

It’s expected that new guidelines will shortly be published that insist on turbines staying 1,000 metres from dwellings, twice as far as the current guidelines.

Bord na Mona, which has an enormous land bank, say they are not concerned by this, and are happy to stick to whatever guidelines the Government comes up with.

Meanwhile their Mount Lucas facility in Offaly should be operational by the middle of next year, and they hope to be able to show it off as an example of what Kildare locals can expect.