Open Day at the Bog of Allen Nature Centre

If you’ve ever dreamed of seeing peregrine falcons and bengal eagle owls, this weekend is your chance to get up close and personal with some of the largest birds of prey in Ireland.

If you’ve ever dreamed of seeing peregrine falcons and bengal eagle owls, this weekend is your chance to get up close and personal with some of the largest birds of prey in Ireland.

Sunday 29th July is International Bog Day, but it also marks the 30th anniversary of the Irish Peatland Conservation Council (IPCC).

To celebrate, the IPCC are hosting a special open day at the Bog of Allen Nature Centre in Lullymore from 2.00pm until 5.00pm. The celebrations will be officially started at 2.30pm by the Mayor of Kildare, Michael ‘Spike’ Nolan and there will be plenty of activities for families throughout the day.

The Dublin Hawking and Falconry Club will be on hand to host a display of their most impressive birds of prey, followed by an information talk at 3pm.

For children, there will be many events including pond-dipping and butterfly identification at 3.30pm. The peatland museum and the gardens, which contain the largest display of insect-eating plants in Ireland and the UK will be open all day, with guided tours at 2.15pm and 3.30pm.

At 4pm the IPCC staff will give a short presentation on upcoming events and and conservation projects.

Of course, a trip to the Bog of Allen Nature Centre on International Bog Day could hardly pass without a trip to Lodge Bog to experience the wild beauty of the wetlands. In the summer months, Lodge Bog becomes home to the Curlew, one of Ireland’s rarest peatland birds that is rapidly in decline. There will guided walk to the bog at 4.30pm with the opportunity to view this rare and majestic bird.

“It will be a fun-filled and informative day, with something for all the family, ” according to staff at the Nature Centre.

The Irish Peatland Conservation Council is an independent conservation organisation best known for the successful ‘Save the Bogs’ campaign.

In the past thirty years it has run eighteen campaigns and environmental educational programs, published over 50 books and leaflets and purchased six peatland sites. For more information on the work that the IPCC does protecting Ireland’s natural peatland heritage visit www.ipcc.ie.

- Rachel Fleming