Psychic sweep at the Leinster Leader

ghost busters Soul Searchers carried out a psychic sweep of the Leinster Leader offices in Naas recently to determine if the historic building was haunted with spirits of days gone by.

ghost busters Soul Searchers carried out a psychic sweep of the Leinster Leader offices in Naas recently to determine if the historic building was haunted with spirits of days gone by.

The team, Sam Stone, psychic Deborah R and Irish celebrity medium Tom Colton, got a guided tour of the old building in South Main Street and the adjacent print works recently, and found plenty of spirits to keep us company but no ‘negative ones’ thankfully.

Oddly the spirit of a little girl was picked up in the Newsroom.

“Her name is Muriel and she is crouching in the corner,” said Tom. “She is snuggled and hiding in the corner - she could be playing or just visiting.”

Meanwhile Deborah R picked up the spirit of a former worker with the Leinster Leader who she described as ‘pacing up and down in the reception area’ beside an antique typesetting machine (called linotype typesetting machine) that is on show there.

“He is not happy that you keep the typesetting machine there and thinks it should still be working and oiled. I think this spirit would have maintained the machine and it was very important to him.”

Meanwile during a tour of the adjacent print works Deborah R picked up the spirits of the former employees.

“They are still doing what they used to do,” she said. “Although it seems peaceful blood boiled here at one time. Something got printed that shouldn’t have. There was a Patrick and a Micheal - Patrick was the second in command. He was very fond of the old IRA - so he may have published something that he shouldn’t have. There was also a woman - the only woman who worked with men. She worked with a sewing machine or a book binding machine.”

Tom Colton felt a spirit called ‘Jimmy’ had caught his hand in a machine in the printing works circa 1917.

“I think he severed his hand,” he said. “My hand is now very sore. He severed his left hand in the cutting press. He was happy-go-lucky, light hearted and bubbly.”

On the third floor Deborah R found it difficult to catch her breath.

“Somebody suffered with their heart here,” she said. “A big chief - a big man. I am picking up cigar smoke and a lot of stress about money although he had plenty.” Tom also felt Patrick’s presence here but believed the room could have once been used as a hospital.

Meanwhile recordings of the building taken in the still of night picked up a few strange noises.

“Around 4.30 am we heard what I can only describe as a sigh or a grunt,” said Sam. “It was crystal clear directly towards the voice recorder, followed by footsteps. We all agreed that it was Patrick, he was making himself known to us, that he still visit’s now and then. The building is a time capsule of Irish and British history that keeps those long forgotten memories alive with it’s residual energies.”

Leinster Leader historian and columnist Liam Kenny threw some light on the findings.

“One connection that has an echo of plausibility - whether coincidence or not - is the reference to a Patrick and Michael, and a mention of the former having a connection with the old IRA,” he said. “There were the O’Kelly brothers, Seamus - whose plaque is on the front of the office - editor 1906-12- who was a nationalist but non violent; and his brother Michael who succeeded him as editor and was more militant and was taken into custody in the aftermath of 1916. It is possible that he was keeping up a militant editorial line post the Treaty of 1921, at a time when the sort of people who owned and advertised in the paper had retreated into the conservatism of the Free State.”