Scully returns to FG fold in advance of 2014 elections

Calm before the storm. Cllr. Darren Scully (right), then the incoming Mayor of Naas for 2011 with outgoing Mayor Cllr. Seamie Moore. It was during his term in office that he made the controversial remarks. Photo Tony Keane.
Fine Gael’s biggest vote getter has been returned to the party to the party fold in advance of the Local Elections scheduled for May 2014.

Fine Gael’s biggest vote getter has been returned to the party to the party fold in advance of the Local Elections scheduled for May 2014.

40 year old Darren Scully was the Mayor of Naas when he told a radio interviewer almost two years ago he would no longer represent people of African origin because he found some to be aggressive and bad mannered.

He said that while he would be courteous to Africans he would pass on their queries to other public representatives.

Cllr. Scully, a former Dail candiadate for FG, stood down as Naas Mayor in November 2011 - less than a year after taking office.

He then became effectively an independent member of both Naas Town Council and Kildare County Council.

However although he no longer represented the party at local authority level he was never actually expelled so he stayed on as a FG member.

Party spokesman Tom Fabozzi told the Leader that Cllr. Scully had “paid a big price” for his comments including losing his job.

He also said Cllr Scully’s return had more to do with the amount of time which had elapsed since he made the remarks than with electoral considerations (FG Naas Town Council member Alan O’Kelly recently stood down).

A party statement said Cllr. Scully had caused deep hurt and offence “in all sectors of society and within FG.”

Cllr. Scully denied at the time his comments were racist. The FG statement noted that he had accepted his mistake “very quickly” and apologised unreservedly.

Cllr. Scully is for now the party’s best electoral performer in Naas and was elected to Kildare County Council on the first count in 2009. He repeated the feat in the town council elections, comfortably exceeding the quoa with more than 900 first preferences.