Devoted couple die within an hour of each other

The daughter of a Curragh couple who died within an hour of each other and were buried next to each other last week has described the care provided to her parents in Naas General Hospital and St Brigid’s Hospice as second to none.

The daughter of a Curragh couple who died within an hour of each other and were buried next to each other last week has described the care provided to her parents in Naas General Hospital and St Brigid’s Hospice as second to none.

Elizabeth ‘Lizzie’ Goff nee Murphy passed away in St Brigid’s Hospice in Kildare on Friday March 16 last just an hour after her husband Denis died five miles away in Naas General Hospital.

“They were such a devoted couple right until the end,” said daughter Liz Browne who is one of six children all living locally.

“It was such a shock for us but when you think about it daddy wouldn’t have lived long without her - it was a fairy tale ending. We never heard them argue they were so dedicated. He was the bread winner and he looked after mammy and us all. I would like to express how good Naas Oncology and Palliative Care was - it was 100 percent such good care. Daddy was in Naas Hospital while mammy went to St Brigid’s Hospice and everybody there was so good.”

Denis, who was originally from Wexford spent 42 years in the Irish Army based at the Curragh Camp, which was where he met his Limerick born Lizzie back in 1955 when she went to a christening in the camp. It was ‘love at first sight’ and the couple settled down in Kildare where they raised their six children.

The last time the couple saw each other was Pancake Tuesday on February 21 at their home in Curragh View.

“We miss them so much,” added Liz. “The longer you have the harder it is to let them go. Thousands came to their funeral - it was like a State funeral they were so well known and well loved. People have been so good - all our neighbours and friends. The hairdressers, Maria Donoghue and Arthur Rainbow in Newbridge would come and do their hairs. They were absolutely brilliant. Being a soldier daddy always had to have his hair cut - he was a soldier right until the end and mammy got her hair done every week.”

In their later years Denis developed health problems and was taken into hospital before he died, to be treated for a chest and kidney infection while Lizzie had suffered from secondary breast cancer and had been in hospital a week before being transferred to the hospice where she died.

“It was a pleasure looking after daddy for the last year,” she added. “If anybody gets a chance do it then do it. He never complained, never and she would say he had no pain. They were unique.” The devoted couple were buried side by side in St Conleth’s Cemetery, Newbridge.