Naas residents continue their daily protest

Residents of Fr. Murphy Estate, Naas, protesting on Thursday, August 28.  Photo Tony Keane.
The residents of Fr. Murphy Place in Naas are this week continuing their protest over car parking and anti social behavior in their estate.

The residents of Fr. Murphy Place in Naas are this week continuing their protest over car parking and anti social behavior in their estate.

The occupants of the nine council homes in the close knit estate are taking it in turns to watch for illegal parking in the small cul de sac beside the convent primary school on Sallins Road.

They have had enough of local business people parking there all day and of parents dropping off their children and leaving cars there for hours, leaving people with legitimate business in the estate with nowhere to park.

Resident Tommy Armitage said there are nine legal parking spaces but often the residents return to find them used by people who do not live in the estate. “This is especially hard on two of the residents who use wheelchairs.”

As well as the problem with parking, the residents also feel intimidated by the level of antisocial behaviour, particularly at night.

According to one resident, Maura Burke, the quiet cul de sac is being used as a toilet by late night drinkers walking home. Teenagers also tend to congregate there, drinking and just dropping bottles and cans for the residents to clean up.

“We have even witnessed mothers bringing their children in here to urinate, treating our estate as a toilet, we are sick of it, said another resident Karen Craven-Hannon.

Local Councillor Anne Breene (Lab) has tabled a motion for the next municipal district meeting of the council (16 September) seeking a controlled barrier at the entrance to the estate.

She urged parents to walk their children to school or use the multi story car park opposite Fr. Murphy Place, or Hederman’s car park which is only a few minutes walk from the schools.

“There’s plenty of parking available without people parking illegally,” she said, “I don’t know what’s wrong with people that they don’t let their children walk, or walk with them.”